Daylight saving time ends tonight, Sunday, November 1

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Sadly, daylight saving time comes to an end on Sunday, November 1 as the clocks “fall” back one hour. As daylight wanes in the coming months, please consider these helpful reminders:

  1. Definitions of Night
    1. Aircraft position lights on = sunset to sunrise
    2. Logging night = end of evening civil twilight to the beginning of morning civil twilight
    3. Night landing currency (for carrying passengers) = must be from 1 hour after sunset to 1 hour before sunrise
    4. Common sense = if it’s dark, turn your lights on, log night time, and ensure you’re night current
  2. A Healthy Transition
    1. Set a consistent sleep schedule – start going to bed and waking up a little bit earlier in the days leading up to standard time
    2. Create  wind down time – shortly before bedtime, quit the caffeine and put away the devices to help fall asleep faster
    3. Gravitate toward natural energy-enhancing tools (e.g. exercise, eat right)
    4. Thumb through your favorite aviation pics regularly to keep yourself in a happy mental state
  3. UTC conversion
    1. Eastern time conversion is UTC -5 hours during standard time
    2. Central time conversion is UTC -6 hours
    3. Mountain time conversion is UTC -7 hours
    4. Pacific time conversion is UTC -8 hours

Other fun facts:

  • Yes it’s “daylight saving time” and not “daylight savings time” – please correct your friends.
  • Hawaii and Arizona don’t observe daylight saving time so they’re back in sync.
  • You’ll have to wait longer than usual for daylight saving time to return. In 2021, it will not begin until March 14 (6 days later than this year), but it won’t end until November 7.
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It was his first airplane trip at age seven that made Eric decide to become a pilot. "While boarding the airplane, a flight attendant noticed my interest in the flight deck and urged me to go talk to the pilot. I give a lot of credit to that pilot for my career choice." He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance and went on to an airline career. Eric now heads Sporty’s flight school and directs the University of Cincinnati’s Professional Pilot Training Program. In addition, Eric serves as a Captain in Sporty’s corporate flight department.