FAA releases new advisory circular – Pilot’s Guide to a Preflight Briefing

0

The FAA has released a new Advisory Circular (AC) titled Pilot’s Guide to a Preflight Briefing to provide guidance in developing a thoughtful plan for conducting preflight self-briefings including planning, weather interpretation, and risk identification/mitigation skills. In the AC the FAA acknowledges that preferences for obtaining information have evolved and encourages pilots to utilize online automated weather resources to conduct self-briefings even if pilots plan to utilize Flight Service. This allows Flight Service to become a consultative resource that can be utilized when needed.

An additional goal of the new AC is to help pilots be better prepared to interpret and utilize real-time weather information before departure and en route, in the cockpit, via technology like ADS-B and via other providers. The AC also highlights several general operating practices including a breakdown of the different types of briefings along with checklists and links to online resources and guidance material.

Further supporting the guidance provided in the AC, and to help pilots better gather and analyze weather information, is Sporty’s comprehensive online training course, Aviation Weather – A Pilot’s Guide. Weather is a constant challenge for pilots, no matter how many hours you’ve logged or what aircraft you’re flying, but with the right equipment and good training, weather can be safely managed. Aviation Weather includes practical tips for both VFR and IFR pilots. From the basics of stability to pro tips on thunderstorm avoidance and icing conditions, Aviation Weather is packed with information that will make your next flight safer and more comfortable.

FAA has also created a FAASTeam Course and CFI companion guide to complement the AC’s weather guidance – www.FAASafety.gov.

SHARE
Previous articleVideo tip: Flying airplanes with retractable landing gear
Next articleA pilot’s guide to fuel testers
It was his first airplane trip at age seven that made Eric decide to become a pilot. "While boarding the airplane, a flight attendant noticed my interest in the flight deck and urged me to go talk to the pilot. I give a lot of credit to that pilot for my career choice." He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance and went on to an airline career. Eric now heads Sporty’s flight school and directs the University of Cincinnati’s Professional Pilot Training Program. In addition, Eric serves as a Captain in Sporty’s corporate flight department.