Updated AIM effective June 17, 2021

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On its standard publication schedule, an updated AIM was recently published with changes effective June 17, 2021. Changes include the following paragraphs:

1−1−9. INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM (ILS)

This change is to edit the following text and add an additional figure to clarify that charted procedures with localizer coverage outside the Standard Service Volume (SSV) have been validated and approved by flight inspection.

4−1−11. DESIGNATED UNICOM/MULTICOM FREQUENCIES

Over the Continental United States and Coastal Waters 123.4 MHz and 123.45 MHz are reserved by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for stations individually licensed to commercial aircraft and accessory manufacturers to use as flight test frequencies. Aircraft may only communicate with their associated company ground stations and these frequencies may not be used for air−to−air communications of any sort.

5−1−1. PREFLIGHT PREPARATION
5−1−2. FOLLOW IFR PROCEDURES EVEN WHEN OPERATING VFR
7−1−2. FAA WEATHER SERVICES
7−1−5. PREFLIGHT BRIEFING

This change inserts language in the Aeronautical Information Manual that pilots do not need to call Flight Service in order to obtain a regulatory compliant briefing and encourages pilots to self−brief before calling a flight service station.

5−4−6. APPROACH CLEARANCE
5−4−9. PROCEDURE TURN AND HOLD−IN−LIEU OF PROCEDURE TURN

The proposed change adds subparagraph 5−4−6e8 regarding arrival holding patterns and removes the current note after 5−4−9a5 which currently addresses arrival holding patterns inappropriately as hold−in−lieu of procedure turn.

5−4−23. VISUAL APPROACH

This change updates Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) guidance concerning multiple visual approaches to parallel runways at the same airport.

For the complete explanation of changes effective June 17, 2021, click here.

For the complete AIM document, click here.

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It was his first airplane trip at age seven that made Eric decide to become a pilot. "While boarding the airplane, a flight attendant noticed my interest in the flight deck and urged me to go talk to the pilot. I give a lot of credit to that pilot for my career choice." He earned a bachelor’s degree in finance and went on to an airline career. Eric now heads Sporty’s flight school and directs the University of Cincinnati’s Professional Pilot Training Program. In addition, Eric serves as a Captain in Sporty’s corporate flight department.