Video tip: get to know your altimeter

The altimeter is a flight instrument that provides accurate altitude information to pilots and relies solely on outside air pressure. This week's tip explores how the altimeter works, the various types of altitudes you need to know about and potential errors you may encounter while referencing the altimeter.

Video tip: How ADS-B works

The FAA is in the process of implementing a new system called Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B for short), which is designed to replace the ground-based radar system used by ATC to track air traffic throughout the US. This week's tips explains how the ADS-B system works and how you can also benefit from in-flight traffic and weather services offered by the system.

Video tip: cross-country flying with pilotage and dead reckoning

The cross-country phase of private pilot training is an exciting time where you'll learn the flight planning steps and flying techniques required to fly longer trips between two airports. While it might be tempting to navigate directly to the destination airport using GPS, it's important that you first learn how to fly the trip first using the fundamental navigation techniques of pilotage and dead reckoning.

Video Tip of the Week: Class B airspace

Class B airspace surrounds the busiest airports, which means there are some important restrictions to remember anytime you're operating within it - or underneath it. In this week's video tip, we review how Class B airspace works, what you need to do to fly legally in it and how to stay safe. Take four minutes and get current today.

Video tip: maintaining your flight currency

After the checkride, you must maintain a certain level of flying activity to stay current in the eyes of the FAA. All pilots must meet with a CFI every 24 calendar months to complete a Flight Review, but there are also additional currency requirements you must meet when you want to bring passengers along with you. This week's tip explains the FARs related to pilot currency in plain English, including when you need to log your flight time.

Video tip: how to calculate takeoff and landing distances

Just about every airplane includes performance data in the Pilot's Operating Handbook to calculate the runway length required for takeoff and landing under various conditions. The FARs require you to determine these distances as part of your preflight responsibilities, but fortunately the charts published for today's modern airplanes make this task a breeze. This week's tip takes a look at how perform this calculation using the common "chase-around" style charts.